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by Rcgp Learning - Monday, 23 January 2017, 12:31 PM

iStock-612373304%20-%20cropped.jpgWe’re now on the other side of Christmas and New Year and are likely to be feeling the effects of over-indulging in our favourite food and drinks over the festive period. As fun as it is at the time, we all know that the party season can really take its toll on our health. Therefore, it may not surprise you that 1 in 6 people in Britain took part in Dry January last year.

Dry January is an initiative where participants abstain from alcohol for the whole of January. It’s the flagship campaign from the alcohol charity, Alcohol Concern and was launched around 6 years ago. It has continued to gather momentum each year as people begin to understand the positive effects it can have on their health.

The stats are pretty impressive when you take a look at the benefits of giving up alcohol for just 1 month. Alcohol Concern reports that 62% of participants last year had better sleep and more energy, while 49% said that they had lost weight. In 2013, Mehta and colleagues conducted a study on moderate drinkers and reported that a month without alcohol had an effect on their systolic blood pressure, taking it down from a mean of 135 to 127.

So how can you support patients who want to cut down on their alcohol intake?

It’s likely that they will have already heard of Dry January, and perhaps even attempted it before. However, perhaps they don’t realise that not only is it good for the health, it’s also a way to fundraise and take on a challenge with family, friends and colleagues. For those who need an extra push, Alcohol Concern have also launched a Dry January app. It’s free to download and helps users keep a record of their alcohol-free days, whilst boosting their motivation, with updates on how much money they have saved so far. For further encouragement, they also have an ‘Impact Calculator’ on their website, which calculates the average cost of and calories in a range of different alcoholic drinks. To view the ‘Impact Calculator’, you can visit the Alcohol Concern website here.

For further information on the Mehta (2013) study and some tips on how to approach the subject of alcohol intake with your patients, take a look at our ‘Health benefits of stopping alcohol for one month’ screencast. It’s FREE to all healthcare professionals and also counts towards your CPD hours.  

If you want a more detailed look at the effects of alcohol and how to support and treat people who are dependent, the following eLearning courses are also free to access:

RCGP Alcohol: Identification and Brief Advice

RCGP Alcohol: Management in Primary Care

RCGP Members can also find out more from the following:

EKU18: Alcohol Use Disorders

References:

Mehta, G. et al. Short term abstinence from alcohol improves insulin resistance and fatty liver phenotype in moderate drinkers [Abstract 113] Hepatology 62 (Suppl. 1), 267A (2015)

[ Modified: Friday, 3 March 2017, 9:31 AM ]